Community projects, competitions and reward schemes for children to join in with from home

Hands up if you’re a parent looking for ways to entertain your children at home right now?

Fortunately there are lots of groups that have been quickly set up on Facebook sharing ideas and lots of people offering activities through online channels such as YouTube – we’ve been one of the thousands of families who’ve been joining in Joe Wicks’s The Body Coach 9am workouts for example.

Whilst learning for learning’s sake is never a bad thing and there are lots of sites that have been incredibly helpful in opening up their resources to all for free for at least a limited time, if your children would like to do something that might give them a much needed sense of community, a specific purpose or tangible achievement then here are a few ideas…

Rainbows and teddy bears
One of my favourite schemes has been people decorating their windows to cheer up their neighbours or families on their one period of exercise a day to spot.  In our area its mainly rainbows with a few teddy bears added too (so children can go on a bear hunt) but there are also a variety of lists circulating that see the theme change every few days (animals, funny faces and so on) ensuring regular new craft projects for your little ones.  We used crayons, stickers, paint, balloons and stones for ours and then had a walk around our area to sample the creativity of other households and there are some fabulous creations people have shared via social media too if you want to be particularly inspired.

“Our local community are putting Teddy bears in the window for a ‘we’re going on a bear hunt’ trail for those who are walking dogs, still heading out to work etc” says blogger Sarah Anguish who writes at www.boorooandtiggertoo.com.

OperationGratitudeOperation Gratitude – Write to a Veteran
The International Bomber Command Centre has launched Operation Gratitude, a fight against loneliness.  “Can you write a letter or make a card for a veteran to let them know they are not alone in these challenging times?”  Click here for suggestions of what you could write or draw as well as address details of where to post or email your letters to – don’t forget to include your first name and age in the card.

ele#Hometasking
When it comes to uncovering the nation’s creativity you surely can’t beat joining in with Taskmaster’s #Hometasking challenges?  Alex Horne is setting about three challenges a week and then it’s over to Greg Davies (via a horde of helpful viewing minions I’m sure) to choose his favourite attempts to complete it.  So far the challenges have been to throw an A4 piece of paper into a bin, to host a “night out” in your bathroom and to make a dancing elephant.  All tasks are obviously meant to be completed in your own home or garden with materials you already have – take a look at #hometasking on Twitter for more information and prepare for all the weird and wonderful a nation left twiddling their thumbs can provide.

Lincoln Castle and Lindum Books Short Story Competition
Lincoln Castle, in partnership with Lindum Books, are inviting people to unlock their imaginations and get creative in their short story writing competition.  Lucy the dragon has been a visitor to Lincoln Castle every 100 years and has witnessed and experienced so much over the last thousand years – can you help them to tell some of her stories?

LucyDragon

There are three age categories – age 5-12, age 13-18 and age 18+ – and each winner will receive a £20 gift voucher to spend at Lindum Bookshop in Lincoln.  “Your story can be as magical, as fantastical and as imaginative as you like… there are no limits… just start your story with the title ‘Meet Lucy!’ and let your imagination do the rest!”  No longer than 500 words and to be submitted on the official form, the competition is free to enter, restricted to one entry per person and must be received by 5pm on Friday, July 31st.

Newark Book Festival Competition
With three age categories – under 10s, 11 to 15 and 16+ – this is something all the family can take part in too.

For 2020’s competition, Newark Book Festival is taking its inspiration from the little manuscript made and written by Charlotte Bronte when she was only 14 years old that sold at auction in Paris for £666,970 in November 2019.  Dated August 19th, 1830, it is no bigger than a matchbox and is packed with stories, pictures and advertisements.

MiniManuscript

Using materials they have in their own home, the festival wants its entrants to make their own little book too.  Imaginations are encouraged to “run wild” but it must be handwritten/sewed, measure no more than the size of a playing card (3.5inch x 2.5inch) and have a maximum of 10 pages including the front and back cover.

The deadline has currently been extended until mid June, entries are to be kept at home for now and the festival will announce when drop off points/postal entries are open.  Find out more here.

grasscaterpillarNational Children’s Gardening Week Competion
If your children are particularly green fingered then they might want to join in with the National Children’s Gardening Week Competition if you have some grass seed to hand.  The promotional week normally runs at the end of May but it’s website has a page of ideas for Things to do that you might want to have a look at now.  One of those ideas is to grow your own grass caterpillar and these windowsill friends are the basis for the competition that opened on March 26th and ends on April 30th, 2020.

PawprintFamilyPawprint Badges
If your little Beaver is missing his or her regular achievement badge fix then they (and their fellow scouting/guiding group members) can still work towards them at home and our group leader has even sent us a couple of suggestions and ways to record their efforts already.  However there are also online alternatives such as Pawprint Badges that are open to all.  I’ve come across these before and always meant to look into them and, guess what, now I have the time.  There are lots of different badges and challenges, I think we might start by looking at the St George’s Day badge ahead of the patron saint’s day next month.

bluepeterBlue Peter Badge
Beth Law, who writes at www.twinderelmo.co.uk, suggests trying for a badge that might provide adults with a bit of nostalgia too.  “They can try to earn a Blue Peter Badge by doing different tasks such as drawing or crafting.  Us parents can take a walk down memory lane as a Blue Peter Badge was the ultimate prize when we were kids.  A great way to get your kids motivated as they will hopefully receive the coveted badge for their efforts.” 

Children’s University
ChildrensUniversityAnother scheme I’ve been meaning to look into for a while is the Children’s University, a national charity that is administrated through lots of local hubs.  Children’s University “believe in limitless learning beyond the classroom” and many of your children’s normal extracurricular activities could count towards their graduation but, of course, like most other providers in current times they have launched a special Covid-19 page with lots of suggestions for home and online activities.  I’ve already been in touch with our local corodinator and, whilst for obvious reasons she can’t send us out our passports yet, she’s happy for the minis to start completing activities and us to record their completion codes and colours so we’ll “be well on the way to collecting 30 stamps to graduate” when everyone can return to their offices.

Blogger Challenges
As well as giving lots of helpful suggestions, bloggers themselves are stepping into the breach and coming up with their own challenges too.

Blissful Domestication‘s Kerry Dawson says “I’m running an online craft challenge for kids.  Mainly in a Facebook group but you can also sign up on my blog for emails and a checklist. Originally it was an open ended challenge but I’m running a mini version of it over the next 12 weeks as I complete it with my own kids.”  Click on her blog post 50 Crafts to try before you’re 10! and find the original post with its Coronavirus update where you can sign up to her emails or join the Facebook group.

Louise Jemma, who writes at Thimble and Twig, is running an outdoor Doorstep Nature challenge in a Facebook group with a friend.  Every day in April in their Wildling Explorers Facebook group they’ll be sharing how each of their nature-inspired ideas work.  Click here to find out more.

Do you know of any other schemes or competitions little ones on their extended Coronavirus breaks could take part in?  Let us know in the comments below or email me at hello@theminimalpi.co.uk and I’ll add them to this list and you can be safe in the knowledge that lots of parents will be saying a big thank you to you for sharing!  

Lincolnshire is positively prehistoric!

Stomp and roar your way through the 2019 summer holidays

Lincoln is taking its tagline “Steeped in history” seriously this summer as it’s inviting its visitors to travel back even further in time than usual to when dinosaurs roamed the earth.  Whilst the Natural History Museum’s exhibition will be housed at The Collection in the city, the museum is not the only county venue hoping to give families a roar-some experience…   

DinosaurEncounterDinosaur Encounter
The Collection, Danes Terrace, Lincoln
Saturday, July 13 – Sunday, September 8
Come face-to-face with your favourite dinosaurs in this exhibition from London’s Natural History Museum.  The animatronic dinosaurs feature a roaring, snorting T-Rex, lifelike models and fossil replicas.  The exhibition is supported by a trail and events including craft activities and fossil handling.  Relaxed sessions also available.
Adults £7.50, Concession £6.50, Children (age 5-16) £5, 4 and under free, Family £20.

dinosaurpawprints.jpgDinosaur Footprints
Lincoln City Centre
If you are headed to the exhibition at the museum then look out for some giant footprints to lead the way there.  Laid by Lincoln BIG, the dino-footprints will lead visitors from across the city centre to The Collection in Danes Terrace.

DinosaurIfIHadDinosaur Galore – Sunday Storytime
Waterstones, 297a High Street, Lincoln
Sunday, July 28, 10.15am-11am
The bookseller will be reading dinosaur stories galore. From new books to old favourites and some even containing underpants!  Fun for ages 3 to 7 years though any age welcome.  Held on the middle floor in Cafe W.
Free.

DinosaurHuntDinosaur Hunt
Boultham Park, Lincoln
August 7 and 8, 10am-3pm
There are 11 dinosaurs loose around the park – track them down for a roar-some prize.  Pick up a dinosaur hunt sheet from the Access Lincoln marquee near the cafe on the day.
Free.

DinoSlimeDino Slime Making Workshops
The Little Pottery Studio, The Lawn, Lincoln
July 28, August 3, 10, 31

The Little Pottery Studio is taking things as far back as the primordial soup with slime workshops – make DIY slime, pick your colour and dinosaur and take it home in a dinosaur egg.  Paint your own dinosaur foot activity available throughout the summer too.
Booking essential.  £10 per person.
Also:
Make Your Own Dinosaur – Ceramic Workshop, Monday, July 29th, 10am-11am, age 8+, £12
Make Your Own 3D Dinosaur Egg – Ceramic Workshop, Monday, July 29th, 11.30am-12.30pm, age 8+, £12

DinosaurJurassicJurassic Farm Park
Rand Farm Park, near Market Rasen
August 24 – September 3
Meet Pete the Dinosaur, dig for fossils and, during the Bank Holiday Weekend, build your own dinosaur.
Entry from £8.95 to £41.80.  2019 Summer passes available for £15 per person.

DinosaurBirthdayDino’s Birthday Party Week
Springfields Outlet Shopping & Leisure, Spalding
July 29 – August 4, noon and 2pm
Dino will dance his way on to the Festival Gardens stage twice daily to teach his audience some party tricks and attempt to bake a cake.  Fancy dress competition at every show.
Free.

Are you heading into the primeval past with your mini ones this summer?  Share your dinosaur selfies with us on Facebook or Twitter.

Crafts and activities for your little ladybirds

It’s that time of year again when we already start to think about the start of the new academic year that September will bring with it even before we’ve had the chance to start the July that will say goodbye to this one.  It will be a big one in the Malpi household as Willow will be joining her older brother at school for the first time and she’s just found out that she will be in the ladybird class.  Cue all things red and black spotted being celebrated in our house and who better to ask for suggestions around the coccinellidae subject than fellow bloggers…?

The striking colours and pattern of the most well known of their species lends itself eminently to craft projects – add red and black paint to a few children’s craft box staples such as paper plates, toilet paper tubes and eggboxes and the greenfly in your back garden will soon be thinking the leaves are greener on the other side of the fence.

LadybirdInspirationEditAngela, who writes at The Inspiration Edit, and Wendy, from Daisies and Pie, just use card and LadybirdPaperLooppaper for their creations.  Angela includes a downloadable template as part of her Easy Preschool Ladybug Craft and Wendy includes a quick video demonstration of her Paper Loop Ladybug Craft.

ladybirdnumbersAnother blogger offering a free printable as part of their suggested activity is Louise from Messy Little Monster.  Download her printable number leaves, add 10 red bottle tops and a black sharpie pen and you can recreate her Learn to Count Ladybird Craft and send your children on a number hunt.   And, if your messy monster is too mini to take part in the hunt quite yet, you could try out Louise’s Ladybird Baby Footprint Keepsake instead.

LadybirdPlateBlissful Domestication’s Kerry shows us How to Make a Paper Plate Ladybird utilising a split pin and Being Mrs C’s Penny’s How to make a simple paper plate ladybird which uses the back of the plate for its domed effect was inspired by a re-reading of Lucy Ladybird by Sharon King-Chai.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI hadn’t heard of King-Chai’s story of a ladybird in search of her spots before but have now ordered one along with another book I’ve come across thanks to writing this post – Tales from Nature: Ladybird.  Laura, of Laura’s Lovely Blog, reviews it in her Beautiful Board Book for Babies article where she praises it for showing “how ladybirds camouflage from birds and how it hatches its eggs… It’s great for young children and babies with the colourful, bold and engaging pages.”

LadybirdPosterOne book my minis are definitely familiar with, however, is Julia Donaldson’s What the Ladybird Heard and so are Crafts on Sea‘s Kate’s children.  Her posts include a What the Ladybird Heard on Holiday Paper Plate Craft that includes a secret message hidden under her wings and a What the Ladybird Heard Wanted Poster.  Younger siblings can also create their own minibeast makes using Kate’s (cotton bud) Q-Tip Ladybird Craft for Toddlers.

In Our Spring Activities, The Queen of Collage’s Helena tells us “We’ve recreated the farm that the ladybird in What the Ladybird Heard lived on, viewed the Bad Tempered Ladybird on Youtube which would be great to introduce time”.

LadybirdReelIf Donaldson’s quiet hero captures your mini readers’ imaginations then check out Jenny’s reviews of the sequels on her blog The Gingerbread HouseWhat the Ladybird Heard Next sees crafty robbers Hefty Hugh and Lanky Len out of jail and heading back to the farm with another cunning plan to cause trouble and What the Ladybird Heard on Holiday finds the thieves in London planning to steal a monkey from the zoo and use it to pinch the Queen’s crown.  Jenny also uses some painted ladybird and bee stone counters in her How to make a simple cable reel blackboard noughts and crosses game.

LadybirdGemFor more rock painting inspiration take a look at Gem’s Painting Rocks and Pebbles on Childsplay ABC which also includes bumble bees and her son’s smiley faces.

Gem also pointed me towards the lovely A guide to British ladybirds – in pictures article by Beatrice Sayers in 2013 on the Guardian website.  “The UK Ladybird Survey has found 26 species that are readily recognisable as ladybirds.  Here are some of the common ones, the colourful ones – and alien invaders”.

Ladybird12

If all of those ideas aren’t enough to keep us going over the summer holidays and fill her bridger scrapbook then we might head over to read Rainy Day Mum’s suggestions.  Cerys’s Ladybird Crafts and Activities include buttons, egg boxes and fingerpainting as part of projects making sun catchers and pegs and she even outlines What to plant to encourage ladybugs to make sure your little ones have real examples of the beetles to compare their creations to.

LadybirdFlowerPotPerhaps you could even start some of the plants off in an appropriately attired flower pot as Jane from Hodge Podge Days has designed in Crafts: Make Your Own Ladybird Flower Pot.

What a lovely way to finish #30DaysWild too!

New books provide readers with wormholes to the final frontier

Titles celebrating the 50th anniversary of the moon landing are perfect choices to inspire future astronauts

July 20th, 2019, marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.  Whether you were alive or not in 1969 to see the first broadcast of that one small step, watching the black and white footage of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin setting foot where no man had gone before is still likely to be one that has had a lasting impact on any subsequent viewer.

(Just to clarify I’m not quite old enough to remember the original, only the reruns, despite my children’s belief I was alive in “the olden days”).

Field Trip to the MoonCelebrating the anniversary gives the opportunity for a new generation to be inspired by the final frontier and I was delighted when my six-year-old’s choice of new book was Field Trip to the Moon by Jeanne Willis and John Hare (Macmillan Children’s Books, £6.99).

Can you imagine a class outing to the moon?  What would happen if you went with a teacher whose head counting skills didn’t match up to the task and you got stranded in outer space?  Exploration, creativity and making friends are at the heart of this sweet story that fortunately is set in a time where it isn’t too difficult to make the 384,400 km return trip to Earth’s natural satellite to pick up a young straggler.

There are plenty of other titles that have been published to mark the historic date too and I asked two Lincoln book sellers to pick their current favourites for younger readers.

Gill Hart’s (Lindum Books, Bailgate, Lincoln) recommendations revolve around the satellite that revolves around us…

MoonLandingMoon Landing (Campbell Books, £5.99) is a lovely board book for the littlest astronomers in Campbell’s First explorers series. Blast off in the rocket, moon walk across the surface and splash down back to Earth with the Apollo 11 astronauts as they made history in 1969.  Each scene has chunky push, pull and slide mechanisms perfect for little hands with fun facts about the Moon Landing.

MoonstruckMoonstruck! Poems About Our Moon edited by Roger Stevens (Otter-Barry, £6.99) features new poems about the moon from well-known and up-and-coming poets combined with classic poems with a moon theme.  This inspirational and beautifully illustrated anthology includes poets Roger Stevens, Brian Moses, Valerie Bloom, Mandy Coe, Grace Nichols, Liz Brownlee, James Carter, Jay Hulme, Tony Mitton, Sue Hardy-Dawson and Rachel Rooney, as well as Percy Bysshe Shelley, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Emily Bronte.

NeilArmstrongLifeThe Extraordinary Life of Neil Armstrong by Martin Howard (Puffin, £6.99) – One little boy who loved the idea of flying became the first person to set foot on the moon.  From his childhood playing with model planes to becoming one of the most famous astronauts of all time, discover the incredible story of Neil Armstrong’s life in this beautifully illustrated book, complete with narrative biography, facts and timelines.

SpaceRaceBlast off on a journey through space exploration history, from the Apollo Moon landings to mind-boggling plans for living on Mars, with The Space Race, The Journey to the Moon and Beyond by Sarah Cruddas  (Dorling Kindersley, £16.99).  How did we land on the Moon? What will the space jobs of the future look like? And why did we send a car to space? Sarah Cruddas brings to life the hidden stories behind the most famous space missions, before taking the reader on a journey through our space future. This children’s book includes a foreword by NASA astronaut Eileen Collins, the first woman to command a Space Shuttle mission. It also includes fascinating insights from Sarah’s interviews with real-life astronauts including Apollo 17’s Eugene Cernan and Virgin Galactic Test Pilot Kelly Latimer.

And, indeed, humans have only extended their reach into the galaxy due to the individuals involved and the titles Deborah Holland (Waterstone’s, High Street, Lincoln) has chosen provide perfect role models for those dreaming of walking an astral path when they grow up…

GalaxyHerOwnA Galaxy of Her Own – Amazing Stories of Women in Space by Libby Jackson (Penguin, £16.99) goes from the origins of space travel to space in the future. It’s also one of my favourite non-fiction books for children (and adults).  The influence and number of women involved in space travel is greater than you think and largely their contribution has gone under the radar.  This book reveals those individuals, shining a light on them and reinforces that knowledge that no dreams are impossible.  Each individual listed has a written biography on one page with an illustration of them on the opposite. Every illustration done by graduates or students of London College of Communication. Just incredible.  A forever book for 9 years old to 109.

HowtobeAstronautHow to Be an Astronaut (and other jobs) by Dr Sheila Kanani & Sol Linero (Nosy Crow, £7.99) combines great illustrations with information laid out in a simple format that makes it really accessible to younger children, perfect when it is recommended for ages 5 to 8 years old.  What is really clever is how interactive it is with more than 100 stickers, a press-out rocket and fold out space scenes.  This is a winner with my 7 year old.

StephenHawkingStephen Hawking by Isabel Sanchez Vegara & Matt Hunt (Frances Lincoln Publishers Ltd, £9.99) – Though not strictly the moon or space, I could not not include at least one of the Little People, Big Dreams series.  Stephen Hawking may not have travelled in space but he was the most famous cosmologist of all time, studying astronomy and the universe, how could I not?  This biography, as with many in the series (which includes David Bowie, Ada Lovelace and Rosa Parks to name a few), is stylishly illustrated yet quirky.  With its age appropriate and simple content this makes it accessible to children as young as 5 or 6 years old.

PlanetraiumPlanetarium curated by Chris Wormell and Raman Prinja (Templar Publishing, £20) is a great addition to the Welcome to the Museum series.  You essentially get an exhibition in a large format book. Amazing for a budding stargazer or potential intergalactic traveler.  Explore the wonders of space from your armchair. Ages 9+.

WheresMrAstronautWhere’s Mr Astronaut by Ingela P Arrhenius (Nosy Crow, £6.99).  Love these lift-the-felt flap board books as they are ingenious in design and very funny too. This one is no different. A fabulous introduction to space for any 0 to 2 year old. Bold and colourful illustrations.  Perfect for the very young.

Do you love a tale of intergalactic adventure that you’d recommend to other readers?  Let us know in the comments below.

 

Educational, fun and easy ways to inspire children to connect with nature

IMG_6479“Inspiring children to connect with nature” is the strapline adopted by children’s activity subscription box company Mud + Bloom.  It’s definitely an aim we can get behind and the minis were really pleased to be given an April box for review.

As well as educational and fun, Mud + Bloom’s website promises that its monthly gardening and craft activities aimed at ages 3 to 8 will be easy – “The boxes will be delivered to your door with all the seeds and materials needed for the gardening activity – there’s no need for you to have a garden or tools” – but I still worried that I would find some of it difficult to carry out with the minis.

So, when one of the first activity cards I read was “Watch a… Puddle disappear”, I was quite relieved.  Helping children to “see how water turns to vapour and disappears when the rain stops and the sun comes out” and accompanied by a water cycle diagram, the chalks required to draw round the edge of a puddle were included in the box.  It’s a perfect example of one of Mud + Bloom’s tasks – yes easy, educationally effective for both visual and physical learners and with a resource (the chalk) that could be used multiple times for the same task or also in other ways.  I had pictured us going on to make various patterns or drawings whilst waiting for our puddle to shrink but, despite being the month famed for showers and the simplest of the activities, it’s the one that we haven’t yet had the chance to carry out.

The card daddy and Luke started out with was “Grow your own… Wheatgrass”, four compost pellets and a packet of wheatgrass seeds were provided, you just needed to find a small plate to spread and sprinkle them on – “All seeds are certified organic and biodynamic. We also provide organic peat free compost pellets in each box, to enable our subscribers to get planting immediately.”

Next I tackled the craft project “Make your own… Water cycle bracelet” with Luke and Willow.  I loved the idea of this – Luke learns best with physical action, threading is a great fine motor activity, I think the water cycle is a particularly compelling subject due to its various very different states and Willow is always interested in anything involving jewellery – and with Step 7 being “make another bracelet for a friend” there was enough beads and thread provided to one bracelet each (we were gifted a single box but sibling boxes are also available).   The task did seem to very much do the trick with both Luke and Willow recalling what step in the water cycle each colour bead represented as both were firstly threaded and then played with when on their wrists.  The beads supplied for this however were far too small for my minis’ little fingers – Willow did persevere and manage the first bead but then I had to help with all the rest.

As well as showers, April brought us Easter this year and the next card we picked was “Make you own… Batik eggs”.  The idea of this immediately appealed to me again as it reminded me of a previous cyanotype printing activity we enjoyed.  We started by heading into the garden to collect some small leaves, flowers and grasses before wrapping them around some eggs in the muslin cloth provided and then boiling them in a pan with onion skins in.  It obviously sparked Luke’s creative imagination too as he was very quickly coming up with different ideas of what materials we could use to try for different effects.  Whilst we tried getting him to concentrate on following the steps as written for our first go he’d be glad to know that Step 9 is “You can reuse the muslin cloth, should you want to make more!”  Even Faith liked this activity as she got to enjoy the culinary results of this one after we’d finished admiring the aesthetic ones.

A few days later and it was time to scatter the organic Nantaise 2 Milan carrots seeds provided in the box.  We are fortunate to have a garden but they could also have been planted in a deep grow bag, container or pot.  Hopefully in a couple of months we shall have some “sweet and crunchy” orange veggies to enjoy at dinner!

As well as seasonal gardening and crafts the box also include nature news, a quiz and a spotter sheet, all of which have been created by qualified teachers and support the national curriculum with influence from Forest School, Steiner and Montessori education.

For the first time since they’ve been publishing their boxes there was an accidental omission on one of the cards but the benefit of it being a subscription service meant that they were able to contact all their readers to correct it.

Sign up now and your May box will include pressed flower bookmarks, poppies, bark and leaf rubbings, sweetcorn and bee spotting.  If they sell out of May boxes before you have time to click then you’ll start with June’s instead – perfect if you’re planning on joining in with the Wildlife Trust’s 30 Days Wild.

You can subscribe from month to month at £9.95 per single box (£12.95 for a sibling box) or commit to six month or 12 months at discounted rates.  Gift subscriptions are also available.

Find out more at www.mudandbloom.com 

*We received the April single box for free in order to review the subscription service.

Engineering festival Sparks interest

SPARKFestThe biennial SPARK! Engineering Festival is back in Lincoln this week for its fourth year.  Here co-organiser the Education Business Partnership tells us what’s in store for the event’s visitors this weekend…

Thousands of people are expected to flood to Lincoln Cathedral next month for the return of Spark Festival, a free three-day event (May 3-5) which celebrates Lincolnshire’s excellence in engineering.

Aiming to inspire future generations and showcase Lincolnshire as a leader in engineering innovation now and in the future, this year promises to be even bigger and better.

Siemens has been announced as the headline sponsor at the biennial festival and, for the first time ever, the event will incorporate civil engineering with an opportunity to find out more about Lincoln’s new Eastern Bypass.

In previous years, the event has seen more than 9,000 people attend across the weekend. This year will see the addition of the Institution of Civil Engineers Bridge to Schools, along with the return of exhibits from top engineering businesses.

The minis enjoyed a day out at the SPARK Festival in 2017

John Latham, chair of the Spark Engineering Festival steering group, said: “We are delighted to bring this festival to Lincoln for the fourth time and are thankful to Siemens for making the event possible by being this year’s headline sponsor.  It has become one of the standout events in the annual calendar for engineers, teachers, students and businesses from all over the county.”

Organised as a partnership event by the Education Business Partnership, the City of Lincoln Council and local businesses, Spark aims to promote Lincolnshire as an engineering hotspot and inspire local young people to consider a career in the industry.

“The festival is about increasing awareness of Lincolnshire’s pioneering excellence in engineering both locally and on the world stage. Our county is responsible for the supply of some of the best engineering people, services and products across the globe and we want everyone to know about it.”

John added: “The incorporation of civil engineering this year gives us a great opportunity to celebrate and showcase Lincolnshire’s achievements in this arena. Housed in the Lincoln Cathedral, a historic civil engineering feat in its own right, Spark is an event that should not be missed.”

Visitors can expect to see a number of interactive displays and impressive exhibits, including a showcase of early civil engineering archaeology to show the historic roots of engineering. This will be joined by the return of our infamous 50ft timeline which details the evolution of the industry in Lincolnshire, along with a display about the use of robotics in engineering to show the stark contrast between past and present. Science busking demonstrations will also be taking place, as well as a variety of hands-on activities suitable for all ages.

John added: “It is incredibly important to encourage an interest in engineering from a young age so children understand the benefit of science and maths. We want to give an insight into the career opportunities on offer in this sector so a real focus can be given to the skills needed in early education.”

The free event will be open to local schools on Friday, May 3rd, and will showcase cutting-edge developments in science, technology, engineering and maths happening across the county right now.

“We’re also really keen to engage the community and show people why investment in engineering and development projects is essential to economic growth across the county. Lincolnshire has lots of exciting projects lined up for the future and we hope that Spark can help to bring them the attention they deserve.”

Find out more at www.sparklincoln.org

To the moon and back again

Ever have to promise the moon and stars to your children in the mornings just to make them get dressed and out of the door vaguely on time?  Well now you can follow through on your pledges by simply visiting The Collection in Lincoln.

Moon

The city centre museum is currently hosting UK artist Luke Jerram’s Museum of the Moon.  In the 50th anniversary year of the first man to walk on the moon, the display of the six-metre diameter moon featuring 120 dpi detailed NASA imagery of the lunar surface will be accompanied by a programme of events including late night multi-arts experiences and afternoon film screenings.

At an approximate scale of 1:600,000, each centimetre of the internally lit spherical sculpture represents 6km of the moon’s surface and it’s on display until April 28th.

Find out more at www.thecollectionmuseum.com and https://my-moon.org/